pianist (22634 bytes) scientist (9824 bytes)

doctor (4740 bytes)
big girl reading (80786 bytes)
little girl reading (100450 bytes) nurse (6984 bytes) girl baseball player (5438 bytes)

See Jane Win

Ladder to Success (8063 bytes)

 


SUCCESSFUL WOMEN ARE MUCH
MORE THAN THEIR APPEARANCE

 Finding2 (3521 bytes)
horse (7055 bytes) I grew up on a remote cattle ranch in the Southwest, where I learned to be independent. We had to do everything ourselves. If something was broken...we had to fix it. If we wanted some-thing built, we had to build it. I was expected to do many things and do them well without complaint. Other people depended on me doing a good job.
Sandra Day O’Connor
Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court

I loved school. I loved learning, enjoyed taking tests, doing things for a grade, and answering questions in class.
Janice Huff
NBC Meteorologist

As a student, I had to be the best. If I got less than an A, I would go to the teacher and say, "Please, I just can’t have this B." I would continue until they would give me some extra projects. I was always willing to work for that A. I grew up in a family where I didn’t expect to get anything for nothing.
Marva Collins
Founder of Urban Preparatory School, Chicago

We asked the successful women in our survey to choose from a long list of characteristics those words that best described themselves in childhood. The words they selected most frequently were "smart," "hardworking," and "independent." Also very popular were "adultlike," "happy," "mature," "creative," "tomboy," "bookworm," "brainy," and "good little girl." They frequently chose "sensitive," "kind," "shy," "emotional," "perfectionistic," and "self-critical." They rarely selected "troublemaker," "rebellious," and "fashion leader." These women tended to develop many interests.

 

girls at lockers (2940 bytes)
Guideline2 (2375 bytes) IT'S COOL TO BE SMART AND WORK HARD

If you're not a hard worker you'll probably not accomplish much, but it's never too late to become involved. Feeling smart doesn't mean you have to be the smartest. Finding your strengths and interests will help you feel good about yourself.

It's quite difficult to be independent from your peers in school because there are so many pressures to conform. Being independent doesn't mean you have to live a life of isolation, only that you should select friends that fit with your values.

Some of the other descriptors will help you realize that you can be successful even if you view yourself as sensitive, shy, too emotional, perfectionistic, or self-critical. If others view you as a troublemaker, you may indeed require help from a psychologist or psychiatrist. If you're open to outside assistance, it is more likely to be helpful to you.

2001 by Sylvia B. Rimm.  All rights reserved.  This publication, or parts thereof, may not be reproduced in any form without written permission of the author.

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